PALB2

Gene Summary

Gene:PALB2; partner and localizer of BRCA2
Aliases: FANCN, PNCA3
Location:16p12.2
Summary:This gene encodes a protein that may function in tumor suppression. This protein binds to and colocalizes with the breast cancer 2 early onset protein (BRCA2) in nuclear foci and likely permits the stable intranuclear localization and accumulation of BRCA2. [provided by RefSeq, Jul 2008]
Databases:OMIM, VEGA, HGNC, Ensembl, GeneCard, Gene
Protein:partner and localizer of BRCA2
HPRD
Source:NCBIAccessed: 17 March, 2015

Ontology:

What does this gene/protein do?
Show (10)

Cancer Overview

Research Indicators

Publications Per Year (1990-2015)
Graph generated 17 March 2015 using data from PubMed using criteria.

Literature Analysis

Mouse over the terms for more detail; many indicate links which you can click for dedicated pages about the topic.

Tag cloud generated 17 March, 2015 using data from PubMed, MeSH and CancerIndex

Specific Cancers (1)

Data table showing topics related to specific cancers and associated disorders. Scope includes mutations and abnormal protein expression.

Note: list is not exhaustive. Number of papers are based on searches of PubMed (click on topic title for arbitrary criteria used).

Fanconi Anemia - Complementation Group N

Latest Publications

Ceccaldi R, Liu JC, Amunugama R, et al.
Homologous-recombination-deficient tumours are dependent on Polθ-mediated repair.
Nature. 2015; 518(7538):258-62 [PubMed] Related Publications
Large-scale genomic studies have shown that half of epithelial ovarian cancers (EOCs) have alterations in genes regulating homologous recombination (HR) repair. Loss of HR accounts for the genomic instability of EOCs and for their cellular hyper-dependence on alternative poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP)-mediated DNA repair mechanisms. Previous studies have implicated the DNA polymerase θ (Polθ also known as POLQ, encoded by POLQ) in a pathway required for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks, referred to as the error-prone microhomology-mediated end-joining (MMEJ) pathway. Whether Polθ interacts with canonical DNA repair pathways to prevent genomic instability remains unknown. Here we report an inverse correlation between HR activity and Polθ expression in EOCs. Knockdown of Polθ in HR-proficient cells upregulates HR activity and RAD51 nucleofilament assembly, while knockdown of Polθ in HR-deficient EOCs enhances cell death. Consistent with these results, genetic inactivation of an HR gene (Fancd2) and Polq in mice results in embryonic lethality. Moreover, Polθ contains RAD51 binding motifs and it blocks RAD51-mediated recombination. Our results reveal a synthetic lethal relationship between the HR pathway and Polθ-mediated repair in EOCs, and identify Polθ as a novel druggable target for cancer therapy.

Martínez TF, Phillips JW, Karanja KK, et al.
Replication stress by Py-Im polyamides induces a non-canonical ATR-dependent checkpoint response.
Nucleic Acids Res. 2014; 42(18):11546-59 [PubMed] Related Publications
Pyrrole-imidazole polyamides targeted to the androgen response element were cytotoxic in multiple cell lines, independent of intact androgen receptor signaling. Polyamide treatment induced accumulation of S-phase cells and of PCNA replication/repair foci. Activation of a cell cycle checkpoint response was evidenced by autophosphorylation of ATR, the S-phase checkpoint kinase, and by recruitment of ATR and the ATR activators RPA, 9-1-1, and Rad17 to chromatin. Surprisingly, ATR activation was accompanied by only a slight increase in single-stranded DNA, and the ATR targets RPA2 and Chk1, a cell cycle checkpoint kinase, were not phosphorylated. However, ATR activation resulted in phosphorylation of the replicative helicase subunit MCM2, an ATR effector. Polyamide treatment also induced accumulation of monoubiquitinated FANCD2, which is recruited to stalled replication forks and interacts transiently with phospho-MCM2. This suggests that polyamides induce replication stress that ATR can counteract independently of Chk1 and that the FA/BRCA pathway may also be involved in the response to polyamides. In biochemical assays, polyamides inhibit DNA helicases, providing a plausible mechanism for S-phase inhibition.

Fang M, Ou J, Hutchinson L, Green MR
The BRAF oncoprotein functions through the transcriptional repressor MAFG to mediate the CpG Island Methylator phenotype.
Mol Cell. 2014; 55(6):904-15 [PubMed] Article available free on PMC after 18/09/2015 Related Publications
Most colorectal cancers (CRCs) containing activated BRAF (BRAF[V600E]) have a CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) characterized by aberrant hypermethylation of many genes, including the mismatch repair gene MLH1. MLH1 silencing results in microsatellite instability and a hypermutable phenotype. Through an RNAi screen, here we identify the transcriptional repressor MAFG as the pivotal factor required for MLH1 silencing and CIMP in CRCs containing BRAF(V600E). In BRAF-positive human CRC cell lines and tumors, MAFG is bound at the promoters of MLH1 and other CIMP genes, and recruits a corepressor complex that includes its heterodimeric partner BACH1, the chromatin remodeling factor CHD8, and the DNA methyltransferase DNMT3B, resulting in hypermethylation and transcriptional silencing. BRAF(V600E) increases BRAF/MEK/ERK signaling resulting in phosphorylation and elevated levels of MAFG, which drives DNA binding. Analysis of transcriptionally silenced CIMP genes in KRAS-positive CRCs indicates that different oncoproteins direct the assembly of distinct repressor complexes on common promoters.

Ravera S, Capanni C, Tognotti D, et al.
Inhibition of metalloproteinase activity in FANCA is linked to altered oxygen metabolism.
J Cell Physiol. 2015; 230(3):603-9 [PubMed] Related Publications
Bone marrow (BM) failure, increased risk of myelodysplastic syndrome, acute leukaemia and solid tumors, endocrinopathies and congenital abnormalities are the major clinical problems in Fanconi anemia patients (FA). Chromosome instability and DNA repair defects are the cellular characteristics used for the clinical diagnosis. However, these biological defects are not sufficient to explain all the clinical phenotype of FA patients. The known defects are structural alteration in cell cytoskeleton, altered structural organization for intermediate filaments, nuclear lamina, and mitochondria. These are associated with different expression and/or maturation of the structural proteins vimentin, mitofilin, and lamin A/C suggesting the involvement of metalloproteinases (MPs). Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) are involved in normal physiological processes such as human skeletal tissue development, maturation, and hematopoietic reconstitution after bone marrow suppression. Current observations upon the eventual role of MPs in FA cells are largely inconclusive. We evaluated the overall MPs activity in FA complementation group A (FANCA) cells by exposing them to the antioxidants N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and resveratrol (RV). This work supports the hypothesis that treatment of Fanconi patients with antioxidants may be important in FA therapy.

Chen X, Wilson JB, McChesney P, et al.
The Fanconi anemia proteins FANCD2 and FANCJ interact and regulate each other's chromatin localization.
J Biol Chem. 2014; 289(37):25774-82 [PubMed] Article available free on PMC after 12/09/2015 Related Publications
Fanconi anemia is a genetic disease resulting in bone marrow failure, birth defects, and cancer that is thought to encompass a defect in maintenance of genomic stability. Mutations in 16 genes (FANCA, B, C, D1, D2, E, F, G, I, J, L, M, N, O, P, and Q) have been identified in patients, with the Fanconi anemia subtype J (FA-J) resulting from homozygous mutations in the FANCJ gene. Here, we describe the direct interaction of FANCD2 with FANCJ. We demonstrate the interaction of FANCD2 and FANCJ in vivo and in vitro by immunoprecipitation in crude cell lysates and from fractions after gel filtration and with baculovirally expressed proteins. Mutation of the monoubiquitination site of FANCD2 (K561R) preserves interaction with FANCJ constitutively in a manner that impedes proper chromatin localization of FANCJ. FANCJ is necessary for FANCD2 chromatin loading and focus formation in response to mitomycin C treatment. Our results suggest not only that FANCD2 regulates FANCJ chromatin localization but also that FANCJ is necessary for efficient loading of FANCD2 onto chromatin following DNA damage caused by mitomycin C treatment.

Peng M, Xie J, Ucher A, et al.
Crosstalk between BRCA-Fanconi anemia and mismatch repair pathways prevents MSH2-dependent aberrant DNA damage responses.
EMBO J. 2014; 33(15):1698-712 [PubMed] Article available free on PMC after 01/08/2015 Related Publications
Several proteins in the BRCA-Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway, such as FANCJ, BRCA1, and FANCD2, interact with mismatch repair (MMR) pathway factors, but the significance of this link remains unknown. Unlike the BRCA-FA pathway, the MMR pathway is not essential for cells to survive toxic DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs), although MMR proteins bind ICLs and other DNA structures that form at stalled replication forks. We hypothesized that MMR proteins corrupt ICL repair in cells that lack crosstalk between BRCA-FA and MMR pathways. Here, we show that ICL sensitivity of cells lacking the interaction between FANCJ and the MMR protein MLH1 is suppressed by depletion of the upstream mismatch recognition factor MSH2. MSH2 depletion suppresses an aberrant DNA damage response, restores cell cycle progression, and promotes ICL resistance through a Rad18-dependent mechanism. MSH2 depletion also suppresses ICL sensitivity in cells deficient for BRCA1 or FANCD2, but not FANCA. Rescue by Msh2 loss was confirmed in Fancd2-null primary mouse cells. Thus, we propose that regulation of MSH2-dependent DNA damage response underlies the importance of interactions between BRCA-FA and MMR pathways.

Sommers JA, Banerjee T, Hinds T, et al.
Novel function of the Fanconi anemia group J or RECQ1 helicase to disrupt protein-DNA complexes in a replication protein A-stimulated manner.
J Biol Chem. 2014; 289(29):19928-41 [PubMed] Article available free on PMC after 18/07/2015 Related Publications
Understanding how cellular machinery deals with chromosomal genome complexity is an important question because protein bound to DNA may affect various cellular processes of nucleic acid metabolism. DNA helicases are at the forefront of such processes, yet there is only limited knowledge how they remodel protein-DNA complexes and how these mechanisms are regulated. We have determined that representative human RecQ and Fe-S cluster DNA helicases are potently blocked by a protein-DNA interaction. The Fanconi anemia group J (FANCJ) helicase partners with the single-stranded DNA-binding protein replication protein A (RPA) to displace BamHI-E111A bound to duplex DNA in a specific manner. Protein displacement was dependent on the ATPase-driven function of the helicase and unique properties of RPA. Further biochemical studies demonstrated that the shelterin proteins TRF1 and TRF2, which preferentially bind the telomeric repeat found at chromosome ends, effectively block FANCJ from unwinding the forked duplex telomeric substrate. RPA, but not the Escherichia coli single-stranded DNA-binding protein or shelterin factor Pot1, stimulated FANCJ ejection of TRF1 from the telomeric DNA substrate. FANCJ was also able to displace TRF2 from the telomeric substrate in an RPA-dependent manner. The stimulation of helicase-catalyzed protein displacement is also observed with the DNA helicase RECQ1, suggesting a conserved functional interaction of RPA-interacting helicases. These findings suggest that partnerships between RPA and interacting human DNA helicases may greatly enhance their ability to dislodge proteins bound to duplex DNA, an activity that is likely to be highly relevant to their biological roles in DNA metabolism.

Zhang J, Walter JC
Mechanism and regulation of incisions during DNA interstrand cross-link repair.
DNA Repair (Amst). 2014; 19:135-42 [PubMed] Article available free on PMC after 01/07/2015 Related Publications
A critical step in DNA interstrand cross-link repair is the programmed collapse of replication forks that have stalled at an ICL. This event is regulated by the Fanconi anemia pathway, which suppresses bone marrow failure and cancer. In this perspective, we focus on the structure of forks that have stalled at ICLs, how these structures might be incised by endonucleases, and how incision is regulated by the Fanconi anemia pathway.

Klein Douwel D, Boonen RA, Long DT, et al.
XPF-ERCC1 acts in Unhooking DNA interstrand crosslinks in cooperation with FANCD2 and FANCP/SLX4.
Mol Cell. 2014; 54(3):460-71 [PubMed] Related Publications
DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs), highly toxic lesions that covalently link the Watson and Crick strands of the double helix, are repaired by a complex, replication-coupled pathway in higher eukaryotes. The earliest DNA processing event in ICL repair is the incision of parental DNA on either side of the ICL ("unhooking"), which allows lesion bypass. Incisions depend critically on the Fanconi anemia pathway, whose activation involves ubiquitylation of the FANCD2 protein. Using Xenopus egg extracts, which support replication-coupled ICL repair, we show that the 3' flap endonuclease XPF-ERCC1 cooperates with SLX4/FANCP to carry out the unhooking incisions. Efficient recruitment of XPF-ERCC1 and SLX4 to the ICL depends on FANCD2 and its ubiquitylation. These data help define the molecular mechanism by which the Fanconi anemia pathway promotes a key event in replication-coupled ICL repair.

Panneerselvam J, Pickering A, Han B, et al.
Basal level of FANCD2 monoubiquitination is required for the maintenance of a sufficient number of licensed-replication origins to fire at a normal rate.
Oncotarget. 2014; 5(5):1326-37 [PubMed] Article available free on PMC after 01/07/2015 Related Publications
Normal DNA replication starts following the stepwise recruitment of replication initiators to assemble Mini-chromosome Maintenance (MCM) 2-7 protein complexes at an adequate amount of DNA replication origins. Under normal conditions, the monoubiquitination of Fanconi Anemia (FA) group D2 protein (FANCD2) occurs in each S-phase of cell cycle, which is the basal level of FANCD2 monoubiquitination. However, little is known regarding the roles of this basal level of monoubiquitinated FANCD2. Here we show that monoubiquitinated FANCD2 in each S-phase of normal cell cycle is essential for replication origins to fire at a normal rate. We found that the basal level of the monoubiquitinated FANCD2 can interact with replication origins as well as mini-chromosome maintenance protein 3 (MCM3) in an S-phase specific manner to secure an enough number of the licensed-origins to fire. Non-monoubiquitinated FANCD2 or mutant MCM3 lacking AA 477-480 responsible for interacting with FANCD2 can lead to an insufficient amount of licensed origins to fire and, thereby, enlarged intervals between the fired origins. Our results demonstrate that the monoubiquitinated FANCD2 in each S-phase of normal cell cycle is required to maintain an enough number of licensed origins to initiate the normal DNA replication. This finding is the first to provide insights into how FANCD2 functions under normal condition of cell cycle to maintain genome stability, as well as resulting implications in the strategic improvement for the fight against human cancer.

Longerich S, Kwon Y, Tsai MS, et al.
Regulation of FANCD2 and FANCI monoubiquitination by their interaction and by DNA.
Nucleic Acids Res. 2014; 42(9):5657-70 [PubMed] Article available free on PMC after 01/07/2015 Related Publications
FANCD2 and FANCI function together in the Fanconi anemia network of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) crosslink repair. These proteins form the dimeric ID2 complex that binds DNA and becomes monoubiquitinated upon exposure of cells to DNA crosslinking agents. The monoubiquitinated ID2 complex is thought to facilitate DNA repair via recruitment of specific nucleases, translesion DNA polymerases and the homologous recombination machinery. Using the ubiquitin conjugating enzyme (E2) UBE2T and ubiquitin ligase (E3) FANCL, monoubiquitination of human FANCD2 and FANCI was examined. The ID2 complex is a poor substrate for monoubiquitination, consistent with the published crystal structure showing the solvent inaccessibility of the target lysines. Importantly, FANCD2 monoubiquitination within the ID2 complex is strongly stimulated by duplex or branched DNA, but unstructured single-stranded DNA or chromatinized DNA is ineffective. Interaction of FANCL with the ID2 complex is indispensable for its E3 ligase efficacy. Interestingly, mutations in FANCI that impair its DNA binding activity compromise DNA-stimulated FANCD2 monoubiquitination. Moreover, we demonstrate that in the absence of FANCD2, DNA also stimulates FANCI monoubiquitination, but in a FANCL-independent manner. These results implicate the role of a proper DNA ligand in FANCD2 and FANCI monoubiquitination, and reveal regulatory mechanisms that are dependent on protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions.

Yeo JE, Lee EH, Hendrickson EA, Sobeck A
CtIP mediates replication fork recovery in a FANCD2-regulated manner.
Hum Mol Genet. 2014; 23(14):3695-705 [PubMed] Article available free on PMC after 15/07/2015 Related Publications
Fanconi anemia (FA) is a chromosome instability syndrome characterized by increased cancer predisposition. Within the FA pathway, an upstream FA core complex mediates monoubiquitination and recruitment of the central FANCD2 protein to sites of stalled replication forks. Once recruited, FANCD2 fulfills a dual role towards replication fork recovery: (i) it cooperates with BRCA2 and RAD51 to protect forks from nucleolytic degradation and (ii) it recruits the BLM helicase to promote replication fork restart while suppressing new origin firing. Intriguingly, FANCD2 and its interaction partners are also involved in homologous recombination (HR) repair of DNA double-strand breaks, hinting that FANCD2 utilizes HR proteins to mediate replication fork recovery. One such candidate is CtIP (CtBP-interacting protein), a key HR repair factor that functions in complex with BRCA1 and MRE11, but has not been investigated as putative player in the replication stress response. Here, we identify CtIP as a novel interaction partner of FANCD2. CtIP binds and stabilizes FANCD2 in a DNA damage- and FA core complex-independent manner, suggesting that FANCD2 monoubiquitination is dispensable for its interaction with CtIP. Following cellular treatment with a replication inhibitor, aphidicolin, FANCD2 recruits CtIP to transiently stalled, as well as collapsed, replication forks on chromatin. At stalled forks, CtIP cooperates with FANCD2 to promote fork restart and the suppression of new origin firing. Both functions are dependent on BRCA1 that controls the step-wise recruitment of MRE11, FANCD2 and finally CtIP to stalled replication forks, followed by their concerted actions to promote fork recovery.

Liang Q, Dexheimer TS, Zhang P, et al.
A selective USP1-UAF1 inhibitor links deubiquitination to DNA damage responses.
Nat Chem Biol. 2014; 10(4):298-304 [PubMed] Article available free on PMC after 01/04/2015 Related Publications
Protein ubiquitination and deubiquitination are central to the control of a large number of cellular pathways and signaling networks in eukaryotes. Although the essential roles of ubiquitination have been established in the eukaryotic DNA damage response, the deubiquitination process remains poorly defined. Chemical probes that perturb the activity of deubiquitinases (DUBs) are needed to characterize the cellular function of deubiquitination. Here we report ML323 (2), a highly potent inhibitor of the USP1-UAF1 deubiquitinase complex with excellent selectivity against human DUBs, deSUMOylase, deneddylase and unrelated proteases. Using ML323, we interrogated deubiquitination in the cellular response to UV- and cisplatin-induced DNA damage and revealed new insights into the requirement of deubiquitination in the DNA translesion synthesis and Fanconi anemia pathways. Moreover, ML323 potentiates cisplatin cytotoxicity in non-small cell lung cancer and osteosarcoma cells. Our findings point to USP1-UAF1 as a key regulator of the DNA damage response and a target for overcoming resistance to the platinum-based anticancer drugs.

Du W, Erden O, Wilson A, et al.
Deletion of Fanca or Fancd2 dysregulates Treg in mice.
Blood. 2014; 123(12):1938-47 [PubMed] Article available free on PMC after 20/03/2015 Related Publications
Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetic disorder associated with bone marrow (BM) failure and leukemia. Recent studies demonstrate variable immune defects in FA. However, the cause for FA immunodeficiency is unknown. Here we report that deletion of Fanca or Fancd2 dysregulates the suppressive activity of regulatory T cells (Tregs), shown functionally as exacerbation of graft-vs-host disease (GVHD) in mice. Recipient mice of Fanca(-/-) or Fancd2(-/-) BM chimeras exhibited severe acute GVHD after allogeneic BM transplantation (BMT). T cells from Fanca(-/-) or Fancd2(-/-) mice induced higher GVHD lethality than those from wild-type (WT) littermates. FA Tregs possessed lower proliferative suppression potential compared with WT Tregs, as demonstrated by in vitro proliferation assay and BMT. Analysis of CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs indicated that loss of Fanca or Fancd2 dysregulated Foxp3 target gene expression. Additionally, CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs of Fanca(-/-) or Fancd2(-/-) mice were less efficient in suppressing the production of GVHD-associated inflammatory cytokines. Consistently, aberrant NF-κB activity was observed in infiltrated T cells from FA GVHD mice. Conditional deletion of p65 in FA Tregs decreased GVHD mortality. Our study uncovers an essential role for FA proteins in maintaining Treg homeostasis, possibly explaining, at least in part, the immune deficiency reported in some FA patients.

Polito D, Cukras S, Wang X, et al.
The carboxyl terminus of FANCE recruits FANCD2 to the Fanconi Anemia (FA) E3 ligase complex to promote the FA DNA repair pathway.
J Biol Chem. 2014; 289(10):7003-10 [PubMed] Article available free on PMC after 20/03/2015 Related Publications
Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genome instability syndrome characterized by bone marrow failure and cellular hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents. In response to DNA damage, the FA pathway is activated through the cooperation of 16 FA proteins. A central player in the pathway is a multisubunit E3 ubiquitin ligase complex or the FA core complex, which monoubiquitinates its substrates FANCD2 and FANCI. FANCE, a subunit of the FA core complex, plays an essential role by promoting the integrity of the complex and by directly recognizing FANCD2. To delineate its role in substrate ubiquitination from the core complex assembly, we analyzed a series of mutations within FANCE. We report that a phenylalanine located at the highly conserved extreme C terminus, referred to as Phe-522, is a critical residue for mediating the monoubiquitination of the FANCD2-FANCI complex. Using the FANCE mutant that specifically disrupts the FANCE-FANCD2 interaction as a tool, we found that the interaction-deficient mutant conferred cellular sensitivity in reconstituted FANCE-deficient cells to a similar degree as FANCE null cells, suggesting the significance of the FANCE-FANCD2 interaction in promoting cisplatin resistance. Intriguingly, ectopic expression of the FANCE C terminus fragment alone in FA normal cells disrupts DNA repair, consolidating the importance of the FANCE-FANCD2 interaction in the DNA cross-link repair.

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Cite this page: Cotterill SJ. PALB2, Cancer Genetics Web: http://www.cancer-genetics.org/PALB2.htm Accessed:

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